What's New? AESTHETIC DETERMINISM

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What's New in Evaluation Tools of Arts, Cultural & Design Districts? Destination Districts?

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ECV = [(PV x Pcs - C) Pas] - D 

AESTHETIC DETERMINISM, A SCIENCE -- Because human action is a natural order of life and that it is the actions of humans that determine markets and capital decisions, Aesthetic Determinism is a science. These links can be proven scientifically; therefore, we can conclude that Aesthetic Determinism, with its basis on that human action, is indeed a science in its own right and not an ideology or a metaphysical doctrine.

Aesthetic Determinism contains coherent arguments, is bolstered by case studies, contains compelling empirical evidence and influences changes in the intellectual climate of opinion. Adam Smith writes in his work, THE THEORY OF MORAL SENTIMENTS, that we owe by nature to pursue our self-interest. And, that this motivation makes independence or self-command an instinctive good. According to Smith, society is held together by both neutral rules and sympathy. He argues that we naturally share the emotions and, to a certain extent, the physical sensations we observe in others. Sharing these sensations, we seek to maximize their pleasures and minimize their pains so we may share in joys and gain by their expressions of affection and approval.

Further, in 2001, Marshall Thomas established as a social fact the undisputed draw museums, art expositions, design shows, gallery openings, major celebrity series, acclaimed collections and festivals offer in downtown destination settings. He determined that we can measure the social fact by counting and we can relate this social fact to others to yield correlations and predictions useful to developers, arts and design participants and other stakeholders. Thereby, we can establish "laws" of particular societies, that is each society's particular statistical 'norms.' This premise being true, it implies a 'determinism' and makes the study a science.

AESTHETIC DETERMINISM, APPLIED -- An evaluation of a destination district on its merits to produce a total. This pragmatic approach contrasts with many traditional variations on 'highest-and-best' use decision-making tools as they correlate to downtown development and redevelopment efforts. For these outmoded revitalization tools start with arbitrary notions as to fixed uses of corner properties, in-fill properties and open urban spaces. In ECV-base decision-making models, careful proponents of artist and designer-led destination districts can justify their expenditure of investment, grant, loan and re-cycled government distributions, including effort and time expenditures, in much the same way as many nonprofits determine, on an annual basis, whether or not to abandon their mission-driven organization in favour of alternative organizations which might better solve problems, meet specified community-targeted demands, or make or fulfill an acclaimably meritorious expression. Many of the claims made by proponents of AESTHETIC DETERMINISM rest upon the correctness of ECV-based assumptions and suppositions - especially as they apply to downtown and other urban redevelopment efforts.

AESTHETIC DETERMINISM MODELING TOOL --  A hybrid tool combining deterministic components and agent-based components. It uses submodels to represent the urban environmental system. The combined dynamic of the submodels determine how the system might respond to human activities. Then, the 'currency' and 'resolution' of each agent in an Arts Corridor can be defined in many ways so they best match the requirements for the urban system being modelled. It is a typical agent-based model in that functional and physical attributes are detailed for each agent type, rules are specified for a range of behaviours and decisions and responses by agents are made dependent in the current state of an agent's urban environment. A notable feature of this modeling tool is a scheduler that functions somewhat like a multi-tasking operating system, assigning priorities to agents and splitting time to give the illusion of concurrency while ensuring temporal consistency and synchronicity among agents.

AESTHETIC DETERMINISM, AREA OF STUDY -- The current area of study is focused on superblocks, clusters and corridors of acclaimable objects and 'character' programs designed to help determine which acknowledged efforts by developers and politicians, artists and artisans, designers and urban environmentalists, urban planners and downtown advocates are most likely to achieve acclaimable, effective and sustainable destination developments or redevelopments in identified downtowns. Study findings, results and outcomes can be abstracted into formulas which can represent the future economic value for both local and regional projected arts and/or cultural corridor, superblock and cluster undertakings and establish benchmarks by which to soberly judge local and regional efforts to conflate high art, design and convenience.

AESTHETIC DETERMINSM | A PREMISE -- Predestination is still maintained by the vast majority of thinking human beings; these believers rely upon scientific determinism - what Barzun calls "the unbreakable sequence of cause and effect, and that is predestination. It is the assumption all laboratory workers make and it rules out free will. Any present state of fact, any action taken, is the inevitable outcome of a series of events..." The followers of great artists, designers and other uncommon doers sense that many brilliant, gifted minds have been responding to a power not themselves; these doers and their followers are a common lot. People of this temperament, recognised since before the 16C, include Luther, Calvin, Pascal, Frederick the Great, Brahms, nearly all modern criminologists and public opinion makers. The premise is plausible because so many of us are conditioned people, a people who respond to, among other things, arts and design-led destination districts.

AESTHETIC DETERMINISM, THE PHENOMENOLOGY OF ART & DESIGNSCAPES -- What Is Going On When Guests & Participants Use Destination Districts? THE MAIN THINGS ABOUT PHENOMONOLOGY AND OUR PUBLIC PARTICIPATION USING DESTINATION DISTRICTS.

If we are to connect using destination districts with phenomenoology, we owe it to ourselves to be clear about what phenomenology is:

" Phenomenology is a presuppsitionless philosophy which holds consciousness to be the matrix of all phenomena, considers phenomena to be objects of intentional acts and treats them as essences, demands its own method, concerns itself with predictive experience, offers itself as the foundation of sciences, and comprises a philosophy of the life-world, a defense of Reason, and ultimately a critique of philosophy. Phenomenology purports to be a "presuppositionless" philosophy. What is meant is simply the principle that nothing can be accepted by the inquirer unless he has scrutinized its character and implications and also recognized that it is a feature of experience. Strictly speaking, a presuppositionless philosophy is not a philosophy without assumptions; it is a philosophy in which assumptions are candidly admitted, examined, and accounted for. The obligation of the phenomenologist is to be fastidious in the inventory and analysis he makes of what is taken for granted by both common-sense men and theoreticians as well."

       - MAURICE NATANSON. Edmund Husserl: Philosopher of Infinite Tasks , Evanston, IL: Northwestern, 1973, p.19

Our original question begs an answer: On one level, what is going on is participants acknowledge, consume or reject - but, in any case - respond to the expressions, the rhythms of intentionally generated places and to the gathering force of people and activities going on in those spaces. The phenomenolgist offers us an approach that makes possible our ability to scrutinize the character of phenomena or experiences.

Destination District Developers (3Ds) - my generic term for people involved in all the arts, design and urban activities; these need not be professionally concerned with or experienced in "presuppositionless" philosophy. The aesthetic and convenience features and amenities and the programs attached are her pre-occupations. So she does well before accepting a set of simple definitions to observe and explore the character of downtown destination district phenomena or experiences. She but rarely thinks about her entire field of inquiry, service and enjoyment without assumptions. And, we have assumed that artscapes and designscapes found in these districts are expressions that generate a need where none existed beforehand. No matter how they stray from the central artistic or design purpose of the inventor or creator, they are somehow related to enlivening the space and the people who come into the space, even if the tone is one of quiet reflection, lament or rebuke. Our 3Ds assume that enlivening guests and participants is or can be a humanly worthwhile undertaking; were it not so, they would likely not put so much energy and time into all the activities associated with 3D expressions. Rather, the phenomenologist of downtown destination districting candidly admits, then examines, and finally accounts for these assumptions.

The 3Ds who are open to the uses of phenomenology carry what Natanson calls an obligation - it is a matter of ethics and aesthestics -  to be fastidious when making an inventory and analysis of what she has taken for granted, be this as an ordinary guest or reflective and informed participant. The risks of undertaking this inventory and analyzing the corpus are enormous. In this introductory exercise we will make efforts to become especially conscious of what we often do without always needing to be reflective or conscious, aware that we can become 'overly' conscious - that is, self-conscious. Perhaps it is enough to know that the 3Ds who are engaged in the work of enlivening, that is making guests and participants increasingly more lively, are engaged in this important work with an awareness of the sort I am pursuing and seeking to help develop, one community at a time.

We owe a debt of gratitude to the major philosophical thinker in the field of phenomonology, Edmund Husserl. Natanson cites examples of what Husserl called the 'general thesis of the natural attitude:'

   "... the tacit faith ordinary men have in the reality of their world, the assumption that the shared world of everyday life is indeed the same for all normal individuals, that whatever exists in our world has a natural history - a causal basis - that we can reasonably expect the world to continue in the future in much the same way it has in the past, and that value, symbolic significance, aesthetic worth, and religious commitments are elements of or associated with the mundane world they transcend. Such cardinal presuppositions of experience are not denied or cancelled out. How could they be? Rather, the phenomenologist attempts to discern their character and to locate their limits. One's under control assumptions may be appropriated for philosophical use."

       - MAURICE NATANSON. Edmund Husserl: Philosopher of Infinite Tasks , Evanston, IL: Northwestern, 1973, p.12

Now, let us reduce this thesis down to the following: Phenomenologists learn to employ both sophisticated naivete and naive sophistication. Therefore, this inventory and analysis work is 'synectic' , which means that the phenomenologist sets out to make the familiar strange, or odd, and the strange, or odd, familiar. Our 3Ds cannot start out without an historical, aesthetic, emotional, intellectual or design frame of reference. She and her fellow participants are aware of backgrounds, settings and intentions. In this present inventory and analysis exercise she leaves all this behind her, aware that she can reasonably expect the world of downtown destination districts to continue into the future in much the same way it has in the past. There is no way, says Husserl, in which she can or should deny or cancel them. She 'attempts to discern' the character of all these, and locate their limits. It is this that shall be fleshed out below.

She can pretend that she is a sentient being with no experience of what is going on in the presence of destination districts and urban place-making. She comes across an urban gateway, a water element, an ampitheatre and sculpture garden or other setting in which she sees and hears gathered people collecting memories and experiencing an artscape or designscape: She has heard of this, often enough, and here it is. So she brings cardinal presuppositions of experience, about which she is to become conscious, e.g., that something called destination districts existed, exists, and may continue to exist, that in the urban redevelopment tradition destination districts are valued, that attention to the valuation is necessary and should be valuable, that today we are chartered to pay attention to it, that the urban revitalization tradition behind destination district planning, development and managment is complex, and admits of many meanings, but it contributes or can contribute to human liveliness - a good, and, finally, that being a beholder - a witness - to human liveliness is the ground of all that humans do and say about downtown destination districts.

I will illustrate each presupposition:

   Silence & Aesthetic Emphases | The difference phenomenological understanding of silence may make: We can start to think about edifying artworks and enlivening designs which are meant to resonate in connection with and contrast to stillness. Art and design in artist and designer-led downtown destination districts are both interruptions of stillness. Husserl says that all phenomena are not simply perceptions but are meant. So, the silences that are felt before the first note of music, the visceral upbeat noted before the first stroke of the dance, the closing of the eyes before taking in a great work, or the breath taken before opening a masterfully written book, all accompany the downbeat, the first utterances made, even though in the everyday world each is taken for granted that most participants pay little or no attention to them. Sometimes, we discern the flight of silence in a pause, a rest or another palpable break in the action; but, all too often only structured silence counts for us most of the time. The invocation, "Let us have a moment of silence..." rings solemn; the invitation, "Let's take a moment..." resonates less so - yet both can capture the power in stillness. In the present context of drawing a sense of enlivening and edifying works, stillness is meant. We can picture a silent universe, the primal essence of a chaotic void into which is poured galaxies of action; consider, if scientists are correct, even the big bang was proceeded by a big silence. These preludes of stillness have meaning for us even if we understand little about the physics. Participating in the constellation of works, permanent and ephemeral, in our downtown destination districts makes no sense unless we are aware of the interruption of and return to stillness. What Husserl calls the 'natural attitude' takes such stillness for granted; its meaning becomes evident when it becomes part of structured experience. Some reflect on stillness, greet its wonder; others 'put it to work' so they can return to the purposed art and design stimuli with a fresh awareness of its meaning. Note: We can observe the differences in the length and nature of the pauses and indications of stillness in every enlivening expression

   Noise & Event Production Emphases | The difference phenomenological understanding of noise often makes: Can there be a downtown destination district gathering or event without noise? With every turn around the artist and designer-led place we can observe people enlivened and, in turn, energizing the streetscape, the plaza, the gateway, the 'porches' cradling artwork, the venues engaging participants and audiences alike. We are braced for noise. Husserl called 'the natural attitude' the way we simply continue half-mindlessly indexing the list of attractions and features and amenities unless and until we regard a discernable signal for breaking the stillness to be a radical and abrupt entrance to artful and designed expressions. So much of our walk through structured experiences in these great places are prompts to throw off 'the natural attitude' and re-grasp the radicalism of noise breaking stillness - a response to being enlivened, a trembling reaction when we find ourselves un-self-conscious and alive. Note: We can give character to the noise we make in response to what we bring to the place and how the expressions that touch us help us heed signals to break the stillness, but never in the manner of, or about

   Awe & Illuminated Emphases | The difference phenomenological understanding of awe can make: The unconditioned life can absorb rounds of popular, soft, sweet and other non-radical entertainments that wash over us - functions not so much accessible but manifest for multitudes. We can also be witnesses to complete participation in artist and designer-led downtown destination district settings by bringing our need for integral arts expressions, beginning with or emphatically including stimuli which attach themselves to our sense of awe and wonder. What would happen if our destination experience begins not with chummy-chatter and the clouds of disparate thoughts followed by an expectation of being passively entertained, but instead with the awe-some in a palette of art and design? Such an experience of awe is one stage in casting light on the path toward liberation: we discern how liberating it is for us to rise from the self-conscious sleepwalk we deceive ourselves into thinking is life and living. We can say goodbye, without mourning, to our appetite for passive fogs of the setimental or the happy-bouncy-peppy and come forth as people willing to engage and be engaged in that which enlivens. Our destination art and design can help us cast light on our need for transformation. Note: We can increase the dynamic and the intensity of our participation in light of how we absorb the rise and fall of the artists' and designers' expressions

   The Body & Commemorative Emphases | The difference phenomenological understanding of body may make: In Husserl's description of 'the natural attitude' people make visual, literary and performance art expressions by merely singing, dancing, acting, writing, drawing, sculpting, photographing and employing other similarly skillful actions; with the phenomenological approach there is a hazard that each artist or designer could become overly preoccupied with reflecting on how everything that happens in the body comes from the physical actions necessary to render each expression art or design. Awareness of this fragile physical character prompts better concern for and attention to the body's role in making expressions for downtown destination districts - especially those with a commemorative emphasis. The accent here is voicing each instrument of art and design. This New Age bids us all to be spiritual in our commemorations; expressing art and design to commemorate an event or community-altering occurance emphasizes a wholistic involvement of the body. But, of course, art and design are not all spiritual. In this exercise, we can move beyond 'the natural attitude', the taken-for-granted and common sense approach to reflect, as art pedagogues do, about 'tension free' bodily involvement. This awareness that there is a body, and that there are actions that issue artful expressions from them, results from being sophisticatedly naive about something often forgotten where people overlook the material, the body. We are reminded by looking around our destination districts that far from being places of spirit, our artist and designer-led places are in fact some of the most material laden spaces one can conceive of, that we cannot even get a gathering going in these places without either an agglomeration of complementary sites or an invented gateway that leads to defined exhibition and/or performance space that often flows into retail or government or institutional space - all built to scale for bodies to move in, sit in, behold, interact and/or and react. The able and the infirm alike can respond with their highly personal 'translations' of acclamation, participation, indifference or disdain. No body stays still. No action falls out in isolation. There is motion in the body, among the bodies, and in relation to a larger world of motion. For some the image of participating in a commemorative exhibition or performance setting is stiff, stodgy, formal - structured; reflective arts expressions do not demand jumping up and down---though there is no reaon to rule that kind of activity out, so long as one has moved beyond the taken-for-granted and re-discovered awareness of body and that which moves the body. Note: We can 'fully' take in the expressions at work in the place the first visit to realize what Blaise Pascal would call the esprit d'finesse; and, on the second visit, we can repeat the infilling and follow it with an exercise that focuses on being aware of taking in solely one element of a work that resonates powerfully on our body's senses

   Rhythm & Harmonic Features Emphases | The difference phenomenological understanding of rhythm often makes: By rhythmic, artists and designers do not all imply emphases on palpable pulsations, yet they work with and recognize how rhythm and the pulse belong to the body and have its place in artist and designer-led downtown destination districts. All the arts begin with a stirring of the body; feeling this stirring of the body may be close to resonating with another body. As harmonies move in parallel, contrary and static patterns, we may be 'sophisticatedly sophisticated' enough to understand and enjoy dissonances, disharmonies and arhythmic expressions after phenomenological suspension of assumptions and prejudices, but most district designs exist in patterns that lend to harmony. For harmony reflects the body in the universe, a physiology mirroring the image most cultures have of creation, an internal wiring many scientists say predicts a predisposition toward harmonies. In this exercise it is not as important to seek definitively our bodily connection to the things we like or recognize to be adaptable as it is to recognize that the rhythm and harmony we may take for granted in Husserl's 'natural attitude' are really blindingly startling.'Synectically,' we have made the familiar strange and the strange familiar, so that our awareness of what enhances enlivening arts and design expressions can grow. Note: We can observe works that stir us by exploring the character of the vocabulary the artists and designers use in these settings.

   Narration & Listening Emphases | The difference phenomenological understanding of narration can make: Acclaimed artist and designer-led downtown destination districts do not have to have stories to be heard or to be told. Sometimes a lone artist or designer fashions great work that resonates with a community. More often, dozens of exceptional artists and designers, working in close proximity or drawn together to explore some advance in techne or a technique. The mass of critical activity feeds a few great talents who absorb the focused energy, the force of intellect and the dialogue taking place in studios, lofts and critic's corners enough to launch awe-inspiring works soon to be coveted and admired for their ability to reflect the values shared and the ways genius informs the very vocabulary of artists and artisans for generations to come. The complete repertory of destination districts has this basis, this story line. This is often implied, a narrative that assumes a meta-narrative that is not explored until cultural historians write the story: downtown destination districts are allusive. They often take for granted that the community knows the work of its interpretors, its sometimes agreeable and sometimes disagreeable voice of critical thinking. The full range of districts is weighted toward the narrative. Of course, the community's spoken and written words about its triumphs, vision and foibles can provide a story, but one then misses much of what art and design is about and what they provide the culture. When people think back to their memories of a locale, they most often say how much they miss the people and then summon up elements of public art or architecture, an annual event or a holiday presentation remembered -- all this if they have ever been sufficiently engaged with art and design expressions enough to have elements to recall. The phenomenological exercise is designed to move us along simply engaged as participants, having gone beyond Husserl's 'natural attitude' to get to the thing itself, which is the enlivening experience, based as it is on story, a narrative to be finally told. Artists and designers know there is little to enliven participants with if there has not been a story told. Critics can expertly relate what has or has not been done. And the community can gather to amplify, illustrate and correlate local versions of stories, but they do not tell the important creating, inventing, enlivening story. The root stories for each district represent mediation between the ineffable, remote, non-story transcendent order of great artists and designers who interpret what they they sense is a reality unveiled and our ordinary worlds. This is the power summoned to make something that generates its own need for a story to be told and for listeners to heed

   Conversing & Amenities Emphases | The difference phenomenological understanding of conversing may make: In the 'natural attitude' we take for granted that nearly all humans can hear and speak, listen and respond, influence and be influenced - which is what artist and designer expressions are about in downtown destination district settings. All that which inspires or moves artists and designers to express the ineffable being invisible, we may not often think about this assumption. The dictum, "art shows, it does not tell" suggests that master works address the maker (and, perhaps, a rabid following) and the maker's motives while not expressing healing, destroying, redemption, condemnation, propaganda unto itself (the subject is 'about' or 'of' some thing). What happens to artistic expressions when we deal with them pre-predicatively? It suggests that artistic expressions are not so much produced, broadcast out to an assembly (though on occasion that is called for in particular artistic expressions). Arts expressions are more for those willing to do the work than for audiences, and they demand, expect, encourage and nurture community. Arts expressions, even the most intimate presentations, are 'essentially' communal. Many arts expressions frequently point back to the 'I' - the creator of the work, but the hoped for 'we' is inevitably implied.  As is so often related by artists, each hears a voice or is opened to a way of going that provides a main theme for the arts expression's conversation - at first between the artist and the 'muse' and later between the artist and those willing to do the work to enter into the conversation. Artists and designers tap into traditions and continuities suitable for their participation in artist and/or designer-led downtown destination districts

   Going Public & Gateways Emphases | The difference phenomenological understanding of going public often makes: In the 'natural attitude' we take for granted that adults normally a) do not present visual, performance or literary arts expressions, or b) if they do any of these things they present them in private, or c) if they present visual, performing or literary arts expressions in public they do so apathetically. Because it is a familiar experience for millions of artists, artisans and designers in studio, school or trade circumstances to present artistic expressions, we may not often reflect on how rare these activities are. National anthem participation is a numbing affair. People are gathered to be amiably, passively entertained, not gathered to shere a truth or feeling that must be sung in concert. Artists, artisans and designers present in public and are a public. It is remarkable to think that millions of adults are doing in artist and/or designer-led downtown destination districts what they never do elsewhere: presenting in public at the risk of critical acclaim or derision

   Unisonality in Realtion to Harmony & Business Emphases | The difference phenomenological understanding of unisonality in relation to harmony can make: There appear to be reasons to regard the unisonal as community-building in especially valuable ways; while 'parts' are units of harmonic complexity and sometimes of presentation, including performance. Both have value. The interest here is in how the community considers its formation and how an arts and/or design-led downtown destination district with a business emphasis in various forms is to relate to it

   Resounding & Artifacts Emphases | The difference phenomenological understanding of resounding may make: When something resounds in the ear or triggers memory we picture reciprocity in the act of beholding; then, resounding does not lend itself to dogmatizing, imposing or brow-beating, no matter what the image in debased arts or design setting may be. Both arts and design-led downtown destination districts can transport messages aesthetically and bring them into interchange. These places are not good indoctrinators, but enlivening districts stand in traditions of expressions that embrace not the spirit of 'this you must believe' but rather 'this is who we are.' A visitor can stumble into a district assembly and behold the sights, sounds and atmospherics of a form of that which resounds in the ear or triggers memory. The great inventors of downtown destination districts connect a lesson or a precept to experience: experience comes first. The leading places, especially those with an artifacts emphasis, are part of that

   Developing Character & Elements Emphases | The difference phenomenological understanding of developing character often makes: The downtown destination district tradition classically and contemporarily connects acts and emotions of developing character to heuristics. One can pick out almost any basic heuristic teaching method theme, particularly in places with an elements emphasis, and find it in arts and/or design-led downtown destination districts

   Story & Designations Emphases | The difference phenomenological understanding of story can make: The downtown destination district tradition contemporarily connects the development of story and teaching. One can pick almost any enlivening theme, particularly a place with a designations emphasis, and find it in arts and/or design-led downtown destination districts

MORE TO COME>>>

AESTHETIC DETERMINISM TOOLS, HELPING YOU TO DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • Examine the effects of public and private arts institutions and firms moving into your area
  • Examine the contributions of existing public institutions and private arts firms
  • Examine resources contributed by governments
  • Analyze the benefits of arts cluster and arts corridor MxDs and use the information to help attract new participants drawn from all 7 arts
  • Analyze the effects of tourism industry pursuits on sustainable arts corridor MxDs and other downtown or urban settings
  • Examine your region's tangible strengths and market opportunities
  • Analyze a variety of arts corridor economic and marketing issues
  • Questions: Ask Dr. Marshall Thomas at drthomas19@hotmail.com .
  • Go to the LEXICON PAGE for additional information

Why is this equation important? While we recognize there is no unified theory of art, there are those who need to know the future economic commercial value of acclaimable artwork, design and cultural programming before they will invest in the destinations that complement estimable projects of all sizes and ranks. This carefully developed equation begins a serious conversation about the many factors that can and cannot go into deciding how best to invest in arts-design-cultural destinations; and, importantly, it moves away from the solely economic and most commonly used tools of 'highest and best use' from the development and redevelopment picture. More clues as to its importance are being added every day by artists, designers, cultural historians and economists.

Some think this equation may be one of the ways we can consistently get artists and designers to the leadership tables around the globe. Yes, it would be better if all involved seriously studied art and design so such an abstraction need never come into play. And, yes, the equation could be more elegant, more precisely drawn; that is the nature of an opening inquiry. Further, many of our Members and Clients face the realities of today's revitalization schemes and come to rely upon one or more of our formulas to help them get lenders, angels and other backers to their table - all so their acclaimable artwork can accomplish its ineffable purpose.

What do you think? Is this equation another way to help intelligent people think about the significance of art and design presented in revitalized urban settings? Can this formula (or a better one) help us all commit our time, our energies and our places toward increasingly civilized living? And, can arts presentations be reduced to formulas; what are the other meaningful, concrete conversations (those that include artists and designers) that we must be having with those who fund acclaimable arts and design initiatives? Please, let us know... today. The first clue is found in the LEXICON PAGE.

ORDER YOUR ADVANCE COPY of Volume One: PLANNING... A Three-Volume Text: Planning, Developing & Managing Arts Districts, by Marshall A. Thomas III, A Father Ambrose Press workshop & roundtable publication. Membership Assn. Price: $39.95  ||||| Guest Price, pre-publication: $89.95 | Questions: 7AF new all points number in Washington, DC: 202-241-0778| M-Th 10-4 EST; Sa. 10-12N EST.

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HA David. In: The Method of Paired Comparisons, (2 ed.), Charles Griffin, London (1988).

MG Kendall and B Smith, On the method of paired comparisons. Biometrika 31 (1940), pp. 324–345.

IC McManus, The aesthetics of simple figures. Br J Psychol 71 (1980), pp. 505–524.

S Zeki and S Shipp, The functional logic of cortical connections. Nature 335 (1988), pp. 311–317.

DJ Felleman and DC Van Essen, Distributed hierarchical processing in the primate visual system: an integrated systems perspective. Cerebral Cortex 1 (1991), pp. 1–47.

RW Doty, Some anatomical substrates of emotion, and the bihemispheric coordination. In: G Gainotti and C Caltagirone, Editors, Emotions and the Dual Brain, Springer, Berlin (1989), pp. 56–82.

FKD Nahm, D Tranel, H Damasio and A Damasio, Cross-modal associations and the human amygdala. Neuropsychologia 31 (1993), pp. 727–744.

M Mishkin and T Appenzeller, The anatomy of memory. Sci Am 256 (1987), pp. 62–71.

J, Barzun, From Dawn To Decadence. (2000), pp. 29-30

RS Lazarus, Thoughts on the relations between emotion and cognition. Am Psychol 37 (1982), pp. 1019–1024.

GE Pugh. The Biological Origins of Human Values, Routledge and Kegan Paul, London (1978).

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K Popper, Simplicity. In: The Logic of Scientific Discovery, Hutchinson, London (1959), pp. 136–145.

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SUBJECTS, UNDER STUDY

  • abscence of meaning
  • art
  • art as spiritual practice
  • artist's soul
  • boredom
  • bravery
  • conflict
  • concentration
  • craft
  • depression
  • disclipline
  • emptiness
  • ensouling
  • ensoulment
  • existential vacuum
  • faith
  • freedom
  • God
  • healing
  • hero
  • image
  • imagecide
  • imaginal thought
  • imagination
  • imagination reclamation
  • longing for meaning
  • mastery
  • meaning
  • messengers
  • metaphor
  • metaverbal
  • mindfulness
  • motif
  • opening ritual
  • pathological
  • pathos
  • patience
  • prayer
  • problemtatic behaviour
  • psyche
  • public art
  • relating to imagery
  • sacred passion
  • soul
  • soul, definition of
  • soul loss
  • soul restoration
  • spiritual practice
  • victim

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NEW PRIZE IN ECONOMICS TO BE ANNOUNCED

In a final gesture to the Membership Association, Dr. Thomas is working with economists from different disciplines to tackle the question of our age: "What is design worth?"

Friends, colleagues and associates from around the nation are joining Dr. Thomas in his quest to help a greying world recognize the significant and measureable contribution design has made to enlivening nearly everything we hold useful, beautiful, valuable. He believes a competently asked question that can describe the force of value found in every man-made object and design-driven concept can be answered and abstracted in ways that can ultimately change who is asked to sit at leadership tables around the globe.

The foundation is mulling over proposals to raise money in hopes of offering a new prize in political economics. Funds will be directed to a new 501 (c) (3) organization, The Friends of the 7 Arts Foundation, Inc., headed by GM Solutions President, Marilyn Gibson. The offices will be temporarily located at 14 Azalea Street, Texarkana, TX 75501 | Members call P: 903.831.9219.

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WHO WE SERVE: A Select list of governments, corporations, foundations, institutions, universities, studios... more. Updated Weekly.

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FRIENDS, JOIN US, TODAY, SUPPORTING THE WORK OF THE FOUNDATION, BY HONORING THE DEDICATION & ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF YOUR LEADERS WITH A PLACE ON THE NATIONAL HALL OF FAME PAGE & PLACQUE.   Please go to the Friends page, now.    "After all, we are what we believe when we give, and nothing more." Dr. Marshall Thomas '00 Address

AESTHETIC DETERMINISM > 1. An evaluation of a destination district on its merits to produce a total. This pragmatic approach contrasts with many traditional variations on 'highest-and-best' use decision-making tools. For these outmoded revitalization tools start with arbitrary notions as to fixed uses of corner properties, in-fill properties and open urban spaces. In ECV-base decision-making models, careful proponents of arts-cultural-design-based destination districts can justify their expenditure of investment, grant, loan and re-cycled government distributions, including effort and time expenditures, in much the same way as many nonprofits determine, on an annual basis, whether or not to abandon their mission-driven organization in favour of alternative organizations which might better solve problems, meet specified community-targeted demands, or make or fulfill an acclaimably meritorious expression. Many of the claims made by proponents of AESTHETIC DETERMINISM rest upon the correctness of ECV-based assumptions and suppositions. 2.The current area of study is focused on superblocks,  clusters and corridors of acclaimable objects and programs designed to help determine which acknowledged efforts by developers and politicians, artists and artisans, designers and urban environmentalists, urban planners and downtown advocates are most likely to achieve acclaimable, suitable and sustainable destination developments or redevelopments in identified sites. Study findings, results and outcomes can be abstracted into formulas which can represent the future economic value for both local and regional projected arts and/or cultural corridor, superblock and cluster undertakings and establish benchmarks by which to soberly judge local and regional efforts to conflate high art, design and convenience. 3. One set of model parameters for 2-stage arts-design-cultural destination investment decisions include the following: Size of metro market; proximity to other cultural destinations; proximity to recreational destinations (often negligible); proximity to nearest major metro area; colleges/universities within 10 mile radius; featuring star, new and emerging artists, singly and in combinations with one another; boundary district/neighborhood condition; current number of visitors to the metro area; proximate historic sites; proximate fine antiques shops; proximate 2-star or better restaurants; proximate entertainment values; live/work arts/craft/design sites proximity; parking conditions; streetscape conditions; proximity ot offices/studios; and,  nominal real estate benchmarks.

AESTHETIC DETERMINISM MODELING TOOL -  A hybrid tool combining deterministic components and agent-based components. It uses submodels to represent the urban environmental system. The combined dynamic of the submodels determine how the system might respond to human activities. Then, the 'currency' and 'resolution' of each agent in an Arts Corridor can be defined in many ways so they best match the requirements for the urban system being modelled. It is a typical agent-based model in that functional and physical attributes are detailed for each agent type, rules are specified for a range of behaviours and decisions and responses by agents are made dependent in the current state of an agent's urban environment. A notable feature of this modeling tool is a scheduler that functions somewhat like a multi-tasking operating system, assigning priorities to agents and splitting time to give the illusion of concurrency while ensuring temporal consistency and synchronicity among agents. The modelling tool: ECV = [(PV x Pcs - C) Pas] - D .

ECV = [(PV x Pcs - C) Pas] - D  Model of a 2-stage arts, design and/or cultural destination district investment decision. A project's expected commercial value is equal to the Net Present Value of a project's future earnings (discounted to today) multiplied by the Probability of Commercial Success (given the destination success as determined in a table of factors influencing value) minus the Commercialization or Launch Costs, all multiplied by the Probability of Acclaimable Success (given in the acclaimability factors table), the sub-total minus the Remaining Development Costs. An evaluation of a destination arts-design-cultural district on its merit to produce a total. A pragmatic approach contrasted with traditional 'highest-and-best use' decision-making tools. Source: 7 Arts Foundation. See Resources in the Products | Services Page

AESTHETIC EMPHASES

AMENITIES EMPHASES

ANIMATION FEATURES

ARCHITECTURAL FEATURES

ARTIFACTS EMPHASES

ARTIST-LED REDEVELOPMENTS

ARTS AGGLOMERATION

ARTS DISCOVERY SPACE EMPHASES

ARTS-INCLUSIVE...

ARTS-FOCUSED REVITALIZATIONS

BUSINESS EMPHASES

COMMEMORATIVE EMPHASES

DESIGNATIONS EMPHASES

ELEMENTS EMPHASES

GARDEN EMPHASES

GATEWAYS EMPHASES

ILLUMINATED EMPHASES

PHOTO EMPHASES

PUBLIC ART

SPECIAL EVENT PRODUCTION EMPHASES

URBAN DESIGN EMPHASES

FIRST & BEST, Your Online Newsletter for Arts & Cultural Corridors FALL2006Edition  |  Copyright 2006 by ARTS ANSWERS  gms@7artsfoundation.org

FOR MEMBERS ONLY.  Quarterly Edition 14, Volume 1   Facsimilie Guest Editions, $39-79 Annually - FREE Member Editions Back Issues are not available.

FIRST & BEST: DEPARTMENTS

Local & Regional Successes, Section 1    Design Service Updates, Section 2    Technical Assistance: GATEWAYS, Section 3    Confabs, a Listing, Section 4     Workshop/Lecture Digests, Section 5   Directory KIOSK, Section 6   Service Trends, Section 7   Government Circles, Section 8   Development Circles, Section 9   Artist Circles, Section 10   Foundation Circles, Section 11   Visions for the next decade, Section 12   Q&A, Section 13   Editorial Musings, Section 14   Project & Program Notebook, Section 15   Feature Article, Section 16   Corrections, Section 17

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QUOTE FOR A SEASON

Budget to reveal the substance of your institutional identity; reflect the vision: Replace any Line Budget with a Program Budget. --- Excerpt, MISSION MANIFESTO, co-published with the 7 Arts Foundation, copyright 1995, by Marshall A. Thomas III

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NEW REVENUE & CAPITAL ADVISORY SERVICES FOR MEMBERS

Grant Writing Advisory Service... Initial 2 hours free to members in good standing.

Capital Referral Advisory Service... A market competitive advisory service for developers seeking real estate investment and loan services from qualified financers and financial intermediaries.

NEW ARTS CORRIDOR GOVERNANCE ADVISORY SERVICE FOR MEMBERS

Mission, Ethics & Policy Review Advisory Service... A uniquely workable and practical way to administer, manage and govern arts corridors in all manner of downtown and destination environments.

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBLITY INITIAITIVE SERVICE

CSR Advisory Service... Advising governments and District Commissions in ways to work with developers and re-developers so downtown districts can promote tangible and ineffable harmonies between people, living and working spaces and the environment.

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THE 7 ARTS FOUNDATION GUARANTEE

If you are ever not satisfactorily served by a requested 7 Arts Foundation training program or advisory project, for any reason, you will receive a full and prompt refund on all remaining days of your Membership or the term of your service covenant, no questions asked.

LEGAL DISCLAIMER FOR CONTENT & MESSAGE BOARDS

The purpose of 7 Arts Foundation content and message boards is to both provide data and information and to facilitate general dialogue about arts and cultural corridor-related topics to Members. No legal advice is being given and no attorney-client relationship is being invented.

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without written authorization from the 7 Arts Foundation. PLEASE READ THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS CAREFULLY BEFORE USING THIS WEBSITE. more

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Important Legal Notice: By any use of this website, you agree to be bound by the Website Terms and Use Conditions

OUR ADOPTED MOTTO

We do for a living what we would otherwise do for the sake of creativity were it not that we must make a living.

Modify The Text 3

"Never mistake motion for action."
                     --- Ernest Hemingway

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