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Recommended sites, references, studies, reports

Complete with annotations, suggestions, and reader opinions as to site reliability as of 31 December, 2008.

Recommendations froma ll staff, members, guests, friends and affiliated instructors, consultants, advisors

Selected Studies & Statistical Views

INTRODUCTION

The following SELECTED LISTINGS were commissioned, conducted or published by the following, some of whom are dear and respected colleagues and friends of the Membership Association: Americans for the Arts, American Composers Forum, Arts Council of England, Arts Education Partnership, Arts in Society, Caron Atlas, Australia Council for the Arts, Sharon Rodning Bash, Arthur Brooks, Linda Frye Burnham, California Arts Council, Center for an Urban Future, Chicago Center for Arts Policy, Willam Cleveland, Randy Cohn, The Commission on Children at Risk, Community Arts Network, Community Partnerships for Cultural Participation, The Creative Center, Jan Cohen-Cruz, Cultural Initiatives Silicon Valley, Cultural Policy Center at the University of Chicago, Culture.mondo, DCMS, Decima Research, Dept. of Canadian Heritage, Dept. of Justice in Juvenile Justice Bulletin, Graham Devlin, Anne Ellinger, Christopher Ellinger, Maryo Ewell, Peter Ewell, Kadija Ferryman, Fetzer Institute, Greg Finch, Richard Florida Creativity Group, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Joaquin Herranz, International Federation of Arts Councils and Culture Agencies, James Irvine Foundation, Annabel Jackson, Maria Rosario Jackson, Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies, Johns Hopkins University, Florence Kabwasa-Green, Ann Kilkelly, Neil Scott Kleiman, Robert H. Leonard, Daniel S. Levy, Julia Lowell, Diane L. Mataraza, Inc., Kevin McCarthy, Metropolitan Regional Arts Council, St. Paul, Minnesota, MISCEALLANEOUS Productions, Susan Monagan, Pia Moriarty, Mt. Auburn Associates, National Arts Journalism Program - Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, Nilima Mwendo, NASAA, NEA, National Association of Youth Theatres, National Governors Association, National Performance Network, New England Foundation for the Arts, New Village Press, Northeastern Economic Developers Association, Ohio State University Arts Policy & Administration Program, Opera America, Francie Ostrower, Pew Internet & American Life Project - Pew Charitable Trusts, President’s Committee on the Arts & Humanities, Princeton University, Public Art Network, the RAND Corporation, Research Center for Arts & Culture, Rockefeller Foundation, Carole E. Rosenstein, The Saguaro Seminar: Civic Engagement in America, John F. Kennedy School of Government - Harvard University, San Diego Foundation, School of Social Work - University of Pennsylvania, Mat Schwarzman, Steve Seidel, Laura Smyth, Society for the Arts in Healthcare, Daniel Swenson, Andras Szanto, George Tien, Stefan Toepler, Andrew Tyndall, Urban Institute, the U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. State Department,University of Minnesota - Humphrey Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Alaka Wali, Christopher Walker, Eric Wallner, Wallace Foundation, Tristan Wayte, Dennie Palmer Wolf, Margaret Wyszomirski, Laura Zakaras, Zing Foundation

CAN has constructed "an annotated directory of statistical studies pertinent to the field of community arts which concentrates on studies with empirical findings — studies based on surveys that use (but are not necessarily limited to) quantitative methods." If you have authored or published or contributed to or used — or even heard about — a study you think belongs in CAN's Studies & Statistics, Community Arts Network would love to hear from you. Please support CAN by making a contribution via their web site:
Community Arts Network All quotations noted, with a citation, from the CAN website annotations.

The scope of CAN's study and research projects is extensive, exceeding the narrow foundation interests of urban redevelopment, revitalization and planned developments by way of arts corridors and arts clusters. Community Arts Network's undertakings are serious and worthy of your support. Please donate study and research data to CAN, and help support them further by making a contribution via their web site: Community Arts Network

All other source citations by the foundation staff are provided as links to materials not featured in the CAN study of statistical studies.

THE SELECTED LISTINGS WITH LINKS TO SOURCES:

[$] signifies a publisher charges a fee [$/#] signifies a publisher charges a fee and offers some or substantially all free material, and [Free] signifies that at the time of constructing this page, no fee or other charges were levied; unless otherwise noted, the 7 Arts Foundation does not materially benefit from any sale or usage fees/charges from the purchase of any of the independently written, commissioned and published works, below:


A New Framework for Building Participation in the Arts
Study looks at arts involvement, arts participation influences, and arts leadership lessons. Written, commissioned & published by RAND Corporation, 2001. [$#] Excellent. A Community Arts Network listing.

A Portrait of the Visual Arts: Meeting the Challenges of a New Era
Study measures popular ableit fragile arts markets. Issue: Conflating "community involvement" with marketing. Written by Kevin F. McCarthy, et al. Published by RAND Corporation, 2005. [$] Excellent. A Community Arts Network listing.
American Fact Finder
Searches census data and statistics by community, region, sector, etc... Written, published by U.S. Census Bureau, 1997-. [Free] Very Good. A Community Arts Network listing.
ArtistFacts
Compendium of statistical information gathered from research conducted on artists’ work and life over two decades. Statistics include employment, financial, healthcare, and education backgrounds for individuals. Written, published by Research Center for Arts and Culture, 2003. [Free] Good. A Community Arts Network listing.

Artists, Musicians and the Internet
Report shows artists and musicians as enthusiastic Internet users. Shows how they think the Internet helps them make and sell their work, gain inspiration, build community with fans and fellow artists, and pursue new commercial activity. By Mary Madden (Pew Internet & American Life Project, Pew Charitable Trusts, 2004). [Free] Excellent. A Community Arts Network listing.
Arts and Cultural Policy Resources: Commercial Sector Organizations
Provides links to marketing and sales data resources for art, books, the music and film industries, and more. In CPANDA: Cultural Policy and the Arts National Data Archive (Princeton University, 2003). Good; however, unreliable Link/reported to 7AF, II07. A Community Arts Network listing.
Arts and Culture: Community Connections - Contributions from New Survey Research
Brief reports strong connection between cultural and civic participation. Shows commonplace community connections (social, family, religious) developing into new opportunities for cultural organizations to build participation. Another Urban Institute policy brief spotlighting themes in, "Reggae to Rachmaninoff: How and Why People Participate in Arts and Culture" (a study drawing on evidence from the Urban Institute's evaluation of the Wallace Foundation's Community Partnerships for Cultural Participation initiative). By Chris Walker (Urban Institute and Wallace Foundation, 2002). Very Good; Difficult to navigate gateway portals/reported to 7AF, I07. A Community Arts Network listing.
Arts and Economic Prosperity
Report: America's nonprofit arts industry generates $134 billion in economic activity every year, including $80 billion+ in audience spending, $53 billion+ in spending by arts organizations, and $24 billion+ in tax revenue. Sites a number of different ways to review reports, highlights and statistics. Offers arts-and-economic-prosperity calculator for users to assess their own communities. Written, published by Americans for the Arts, 2002. [Free: See Calculator Feature] Very Good. A Community Arts Network listing.
Arts and Non-Arts Partnerships: Opportunities, Challenges and Strategies
Study (surveys, interviews) : Partnerships supported by Community Partnerships for Cultural Participation Initiative, funded by Wallace Foundation 1998-2002. Includes non-arts partners, including community development participants. Findings: arts groups’ benefits include greater public credit for community involvement, connections to new communities of potential participants, and wider opportunities to carry out creative work; non-arts groups’ benefits include improved programs and a reputation for being more effective in their community work. By Christopher Walker (Urban Institute, 2004). Very Good; however, unreliable link/reported to 7AF, II07. A Community Arts Network listing.
Arts, Cultural, and Humanities Organizations in the Rhode Island Economy, Report Summary
Shows $241.2-million arts impact on the state. Demonstrates how the arts can offer a win-win investment for the state when combined with intensive community investment (millions of performance and volunteer hours); shows impact on tourist industry and the increase in indirect audience spending in places like downtown Providence. By Gregory Wassall (New England Foundation for the Arts, 1996). [Free] Very Good, Introduction. A Community Arts Network listing.
City Rankings
Database ranks cities by density of creative class (knowledge workers), diversity, high tech and innovation. Maps display national creativity index, diversity index, innovation index, etc. No information about sources of study or detailed explanations of each index. Written, published by Richard Florida Creativity Group, 2003. [Free Creativity Index Rankings] Good. A Community Arts Network listing.
Competing for Talent: Implications for Social and Cultural Policy in Canadian City-Regions
Report: Determine how Canada's urban centers apply Richard Florida's theories about the creative class -- “people who create knowledge rather than products and seek out cities to live in based on quality of life and amenities rather than a particular company.” Links cultural opportunities, arts and diversity to economic success. By Betsy Donald and Douglas Morrow with Andrew Athanasiu (Department of Canadian Heritage, 2003). [Free]. Very Good. A Community Arts Network listing.
Connecting Californians: Finding the Art of Community Change
Study explores the concept of ‘story’ as a powerful means toward building community. “Based on a ten-month public conversation at the intersection of the arts, the humanities, grassroots narrative and community organizing. Presents findings of inquiry, case studies, map of the field, monographs, focus-group transcripts, literature review, questions for the future and a potential program design.” Written by Dudley Cocke, Craig McGarvey, Erica Kohl, Linda Frye Burnham. Published by James Irvine Foundation and online by Community Arts Network, 2000. [Free] Very Good. A Community Arts Network listing.
Continental Harmony: A Study in Community-based Arts
Report: Studies a new method to evaluate a Millennium Project that matched composers with communities in every state. By Patricia Shifferd and William Cleveland (Underwriter - Rockefeller Foundation; published by American Composers Forum, 2001; also published on CAN, 2001). [Free] Excellent. A Community Arts Network listing.
Creative Industries 2005: The Congressional Report
Tracks and maps arts-related entities in six creative industries. “Finds arts-centric businesses represent 4.4 percent of all businesses and 2.2 percent of all U.S. jobs and are present in all 435 Congressional districts.” Written, published by Americans for the Arts, 2005. [Free] Very Good. A Community Arts Network listing.
Crossover: How Artists Build Careers across Commercial, Non-profit and Community Work
Study: Some fine artists are increasingly contributing their time/talents to for-profit projects. Basis: “interviews with artists in Los Angeles and San Francisco, Calif. Offers recommendations on how the arts sector can emulate the coalitions being built in the high-tech and healthcare industries.” Written by Ann Markusen, published by University of Minnesota's Humphrey Institute, 2006. [$/#] Very Good. A Community Arts Network listing.
Cultural Participation Survey 1998
Outcomes for the Wallace Foundation Community Partnerships for Cultural Participation (CPCP) initiative. “Measures cultural participation of individuals in Kansas City and northern California counties.” By Urban Institute, 1998. [Free] Excellent. A Community Arts Network listing.
Cultural Policy and the Arts National Data Archive (CPANDA)
Database collaboration - Princeton University's Firestone Library and its Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies. "An interactive digital archive of data on the arts and cultural policy in the U.S., available for research and statistical analysis, with data on artists, arts and cultural organizations, audiences, and funding for arts and culture." Presents raw data, research resources, ‘quick facts’ on artists, arts organizations, audiences and support for arts. By Firestone Library and Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies, Princeton University (Princeton University, 2002-present). [Free] Very Good. A Community Arts Network listing.
Cultural Vitality in Communities: Interpretation and Indicators
Monograph: Urban Institute’s Arts and Culture Indicators Project. “Introduces a widened definition of "cultural vitality" as "evidence of creating, disseminating, validating, and supporting arts and culture as a dimension of everyday life in communities." Broadens ‘participation’ to encompass festival making, amateur arts practice and public validation and discussion of cultural practices in many forms, including print, the Web and arts education (in-school and after-school). Engages "a more diverse and powerful set of stakeholders," including people who are not arts "experts" or professionals.” The authors think this wider view ‘compels’ policymakers, funders and administrators to change ways of thinking about culture. Written by Maria-Rosario Jackson, Florence Kabwasa-Green and Joaquin Herranz; published by Urban Institute, 2006. [Free] Excellent. A Community Arts Network listing.
Culture Builds Community
Project evaluation of Culture Builds Communities in Philadelphia, a Pennsylvania grant program that funded small arts organizations and artists involved in neighborhood revitalization. “Study used financial indicators, class registration statistics, population changes and long-term maintenance of relationships to evaluate success of the program. Findings: 1) strengthening cultural sector has net positive results in community; (2) sustaining a cultural sector depends on recognizing and supporting networks of key actors, including community-based artists, for-profit cultural firms, informal cultural organizations, and related non-arts organizations.” By Susan Seifert and Mark Stern (Social Impact of the Arts Project, School of Social Work, University of Pennsylvania, 2002). [Free] Very Good. A Community Arts Network listing.
Culture and Commerce: The Traditional Arts and Economic Development A Community Arts Network listing.

Culture Counts in Communities: A Framework for Measurement Maria Rosario Jackson and Joaquin Herranz. 2002. [Free] Excellent. A Community Arts Network listing.
Culture.mondo Surveys on Cultural Portals
“Results from annual surveys eliciting information on structure, management, geography, budget, demographics, audiences, services, content and performance measurements portals worldwide.“ Written by Decima Research,;published by Culture.mondo beginning 2005. [$/#] Good. A Community Arts Network listing.
Final Report: Satisfaction and Outcomes Assessment, Hospital Artist-in-Residence Program
“Evaluation demonstrates hospital artist-in-residence program is highly successful in relieving patient anxiety, reducing job burdens on caregivers and potentially increasing patient willingness to talk about their condition and treatment options.” Written, published by The Creative Center: Arts for People with Cancer, 2002. [Free] Good. A Community Arts Network listing.

From Reggae to Rachmaninoff: How and Why People Participate in Arts and Culture
Cultural-participation survey in five U.S. communities provides data about various participation types and venues. “Draws on evidence from the Urban Institute’s evaluation of the Wallace Foundation's Community Partnerships for Cultural Participation initiative.” By Chris Walker, Stephanie Scott-Melnyk with Kay Sherwood (Urban Institute and Wallace Foundation, 2002). Unreliable portal/reported I07. A Community Arts Network listing.
Gifts of the Muse: Reframing the Debate About the Benefits of the Arts
Study premise: advocates can become less fixated on what the arts can do for business growth and kids' math and reading scores, and focus instead on intangibles such as enchantment, enlightenment and community building. Written, published by RAND corporation, 2004. [$/#] Excellent.
Hardwired To Connect: The New Scientific Case for Authoritative Communities
“New scientific findings, based in brain research, suggesting "authoritative" communities -- not punitive or authoritarian -- combining nurture and structure to help children and young people form important attachments and finding a safe place to explore big questions about morality, spirituality, human existence.” Written, published by The Commission on Children at Risk, 2003. [$] Good.
How States Are Using Arts and Culture to Strengthen Their Global Trade Development
Study on cultural exchanges with foreign countries; "sister state" relationships; cultural leaders included on trade missions, etc. “Case studies, examples of successful programs, research citations, useful quotes.” Written, published by NASAA, National Governors Association and NEA, 2003. [Free] Good.
Immigrant Participatory Arts: An Insight into Community-building in Silicon Valley Study finding: The dominant reason for the existence of amateur arts groups in immigrant communities derives from a strong desire of parents to maintain structure, vlaues, language and traditions of their families. Ninety Santa Clara County, CA, participatory arts groups were sources for the six-month study. By Pia Moriarty (cultural Initiatives Silicon Valley - now closed, 2004). [Free] Good.
Individual Participation and Community Arts Groups: A Quantitative Analysis of Study, a working paper, looks at a correlation between individual participation in arts and the number of arts organizations located in an individual's immediate community. “Relationship is a more important indicator of participation than age, socioeconomic or ethnic status. Makes strong case for clustering arts organizations in neighborhoods and communities.” By Susan Seifert and Mark Stern (Social Impact of the Arts Project, School of Social Work, University of Pennsylvania, 1994). [Free] Good.
InfoUSA: Arts and Culture
U.S. State Department site: "Guide to the historic and current state of the arts in the U.S.; gateway to traditional and popular culture experienced in America today." Includes statistics. [Free] Good.

Investing in Creativity: A Study of the Support Structure for U.S. Artists. By Maria Rosario Jackson, Florence Kabwasa-Green, Daniel Swenson, Joaquin Herranz, Kadija Ferryman, Caron Atlas, Eric Wallner, and Carole E. Rosenstein. 2003. [Free] Very Good.

Louisiana: Where Culture Means Business The economic development plan for State of Louisiana. Focus: Addresses new jobs, enterprises and quality of life for Louisiana’s self-employed artists, art and cultural components of educational institutions and businesses producing goods and services involving the arts. “Unveiled days before H Philadelphia
urricane Katrina and used in continuing discussions with the state to ensure that the cultural economy is central to Louisiana’s recovery.” Written, published by Mt. Auburn Associates, 2005. [Free] Very Good.

Investing in Culture: Innovations in State Cultural Policy - Publication source: Innovations in State Cultural Policy project, funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts. Basis: Policy Partners, the Cultural Policy Working Group of the National Conference of State Legislatures was commissioned to write this report. Designed to assist legislators who want to strengthen their states' cultural agenda. [Free] Very Good. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures.
Making Exact Change
Study: How U.S. arts-based programs have made a significant and sustained impact on communities. Case studies of ten exemplary organizations. Written by Willam Cleveland. Published by Community Arts Network, 2005. [$/#] Very Good.
National Arts Education Public Awareness Campaign Survey
Monograph: Outcomes of Americans for the Arts' 2001 arts-education public-awareness survey. “Finds 95 percent of parents believe arts are important in preparing children for the future, and 91 percent believe arts are an important part of a well-rounded education.” Written, published by Americans for the Arts, 2001. Unreliable portal/reported II07.
National Arts Policy Database
Information about documentation and publications related to arts and culture since 1960. Approx. 7,000 items, searchable by topic (examples: arts and public funding, cultural policy, community development and the arts). Each item has an abstract and lists publication and contact information. Written, published by Americans for the Arts, 2003. Unreliable portal/reported I07.
National and Local Profiles of Cultural Support: Executive Summary
Commissioned by Pew Charitable Trusts; conducted by Ohio State University Arts Policy and Administration program. Analysis: Public and private sources of support for arts and culture in U.S. through a national survey and detailed study of ten diverse communities (see The Arts and Humanities in Montgomery County: An Empirical Profile). “Executive summary gives overview of research, including some charts and data. Funding information, descriptions of multiple resources, and recommendations for the future.” By Randy Cohen and Margaret Wyszomirski (Americans for the Arts, 2002). {Free] Very Good.
New England's Creative Economy: The Non-profit Sector, 2002
Study finding: Cultural nonprofits, New England have an estimated economic impact = $6.654 billion. Includes spending, income, net assets, admissions, employment, volunteers and taxes. “Based on a regionwide direct 2004 survey and IRS data for 1996-2002.” By New England Foundation for the Arts (2005). [Free] Good.
Participation in Arts and Culture: The Importance of Community Venues
Report finding: More people participate in arts and cultural events in open-air spaces, schools, places of worship and other nontraditional venues than in conventional arts venues. “One of several Urban Institute policy briefs that spotlight themes in "Reggae to Rachmaninoff: How and Why People Participate in Arts and Culture" (a study that draws on evidence from the Urban Institute's evaluation of the Wallace Foundation's Community Partnerships for Cultural Participation initiative).” By Christopher Walker (Urban Institute and Wallace Foundation, 2003). [$/#] Excellent.
Partnerships Between Large and Small Cultural Organizations: A Strategy for Building Arts Participation
Study of ten large-small scale partnerships supported by The Wallace Foundation's Community Partnerships for Cultural Participation initiative. By Francie Ostrower (Urban Institute, 2004). [Free] Very Good.
Paving the way
Study maps the youth-and-participatory-theater sector with baseline assessment of activity across England. Summarizes findings of an extensive mapping study, regional mapping reports and case-study research. “Commissioned to inform development of the Young People's Participatory Theatre project a three-year initiative (2005/06 - 20008/09), funded by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS).” By Arts Council England, partnering with National Association of Youth Theatres, 2007. [Free] Very Good.
Performing Arts Research Coalition (PARC)
“Three-year audience-research project on culture-going habits of citizens in ten U.S. cities, confirming that people attend performing arts-related events more than sporting events and place a high value on the presence of performing arts near where they live, work, and seek cultural outlets.” By Urban Institute (Opera America, et al, 2004). Unreliable portal/reported I07.
Performing Arts in a New Era
RAND Corp. study predicting dim future for mid-sized arts organizations. By Kevin McCarthy, Arthur Brooks, Julia Lowell, Laura Zakaras (Rand, 2001). [$/#] Very Good.
Performing Communities: The Grassroots Ensemble Theater Research Project
Study of ensemble theaters deeply rooted in eight U.S. communities for decades. “Presents 86 interviews with diverse artist ensembles and their communities, then layers it with comments by site visitors and critiques by experts in the field of community-based arts. “Also included : theater profiles, photo galleries, play excerpts, documentary resource inventories.” By Robert H. Leonard, Ann Kilkelly, Jan Cohen-Cruz, Linda Frye Burnham, et. al., Published online by Community Arts Network, 2002. (Published in paperback by New village Press, 2006.) [Free] Very Good.
Planning for Grassroots Arts Development: A Research Study of Nine Communities in Transition
Three-year 1973 study of first rural arts award made by National Endowment for the Arts, which identified five small Wisconsin towns and undertook a stepwise arts development program there. Compared attitudes of people to the arts in these towns with four "control communities" - towns demographically similar, with no arts infrastructure. During 2004-5, the Wisconsin Arts Board and others will revisit these communities and two others to see what has happened since. By Maryo Ewell and Peter Ewell (Arts in Society, 1975). Difficult to navigate portal/reported II07.
Public Art Programs Fiscal Year 2001
Report: Budgeting and programming of U.S. public art programs during FY 2001. “Information about public art revenue sources and budget history, composition of artist-selection panels, details about how public art programs are staffed, and more about the nuts and bolts of public art administration.” By Public Art Network (American for the Arts, 2004) Difficult to navigate portal/reported I07.

Rebuilding the Cultural Vitality of New Orleans. Maria Rosario Jackson. 2006. Free. Very Good.

Reading at Risk: A Survey of Literary Reading in America
Survey: 17,000 adults questioned reveal fewer than half of American adults (45 percent/93 million) now read literature; a 10 percent drop from 1982 to 2002. Written, published by National Endowment for the Arts, 2004. [Free] Very Good.
Report on Social Healing Arts
Conceptualizes "arts for social healing" as values-based work located within three larger, overlapping efforts to effect arts for change: (1) arts for community development, (2) arts for social action, and (3) arts for individual healing. “Suggests that a key strategy to strengthen the field would be to support new partnerships between and within three constituencies: practitioners of arts, contributers and agents of change.” Written by Anne and Christopher Ellinger of Zing Foundation; published by the Fetzer Institute, 2005. [Free] Good.
Reporting the Arts II: News Coverage of Arts and Culture in America
Follow-up to 1999 study examines the big transformation of the media landscape in the wake of newspaper mergers, 9/11 and U.S. economic decline. “Analyzes how the and national press balance between high and popular arts and critical and celebrity journalism. First-time look at foreign arts reporting, non-English and alternative press and coverage on radio and Web.” By Andras Szanto, Daniel S. Levy, Andrew Tyndall (National Arts Journalism Program/ Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, 2004). [$/# - Overview only] Excellent.
Research Note #85, Artist Labor Force by State, 2000
Report: Statewide location of workers in 11 detailed artist occupations. “It examines state concentration of artists as a share of total civilian labor force, and state patterns in the location of individual artist occupations.” Written, published by National Endowment for the Arts, 2004. [Free] Very Good.
Research Projects, Cultural Policy Center, University of Chicago
This nearly new center conducts projects to collect and analyze data in different arts environments and communities to produce statistics about arts and culture. Goal: Help guide cultural policy in the U.S. Written, published by Cultural Policy Center at the University of Chicago, 2003. [$/#] Excellent.
Research Reports
Site contains summaries of recent arts-related research in multiple fields, monographs, articles, tools and guides for conducting your own research. By the Wallace Foundation, 2003-present. [Free] Excellent.
Research: Arts and Healthcare
Brief descriptions, links and conference proceedings from several recent studies. Written, published by Society for the Arts in Healthcare, 2002-2003. Difficult to navigate portal/reported II07. Rethinking New York's Street Fairs
By Jonathan Bowles and Tara Colton In this policy brief, the Center documents that city street fairs are dominated by a handful of the same vendors selling bland items like tube socks and t-shirts, and that a surprisingly high percentage of vendors are based outside of the city. It calls on the city to make the fairs less generic. [Free] Good.
Social Impact of the Arts Project (SIAP)
Launched in 1994; conducts policy research projects that describe and analyze the role cultural organizations play in metropolitan Philadelphia, Pa., and neighborhoods. Part of larger effort nationwide, particularly including the Arts and Cultural Indicators Project (ACIP) of the Urban Institute, to consider seriously the place of arts and culture in construction of social and public policy. Mark Stern and Susan Seifert, project directors. Written, published by School of Social Work, University of Pennsylvania, 1994-. [Free] Very Good.
Some Australian Arts Statistics
Results of recent surveys by Australian government illustrating national arts climate, arts employment, arts participation, and distribution of resources. Written, published by Australia Council for the Arts, 2003. [Free] Very Good.
Stand and Unfold Yourself: A Monograph on the Shakespeare and Company Research Study
Harvard's Project Zero study: 2 seasons of 20-year-old professional theater company's school-education programs. “Asked: (1) Why do these programs work so well? (2) What are participants are actually learning? (3) What is critical to success of these programs? Found arts provide ideal setting for "profound learning experiences" in high levels of literacy, social and personal growth and development, and development of higher-order thinking skills.” By Steve Seidel (In Champions of Change, the Arts Education Partnership and the President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities, 1999). [Free] Very Good.
State Arts Agencies 1965-2003: Whose Interests to Serve?
RAND study outcome: Agencies should view their role as providing a service to all state residents, rather than service to artists and nonprofit arts organizations, and they must get a consensus from a much broader spectrum of Americans than was true in the past. “From State Arts Partnerships for Cultural Participation (START) initiative commissioned by Wallace Foundation.” By Julia F. Lowell (RAND Corporation, 2004). [Free] Good.
Statistical Indicators for Arts Policy: Discussion Paper from IFACCA
Identifies current work and global resources on cultural indicators, explores analytical and coordination issues and makes suggestions for future. “Summarizes IFACCA's work on the issue to date; provides brief overview of cultural-indicators literature.” Written, published by International Federation of Arts Councils and Culture Agencies (IFACCA), 2004. Difficult to navigate portal/reported I07.
Strengthening Rural Economies through the Arts
Study: States are turning to arts-based economic development strategies to revive rural economies. “Case studies, examples of successful programs, research citations, useful quotes.” Written, published by NASAA, National Governors Association and NEA, 2005. [Free] Good.
Survey of Arts and Cultural Organizations 2000
Studies audience-diversification strategies and organizational partnerships of government or nonprofit art and culture organizations participating in the Wallace Foundation Community Partnerships for Cultural Participation (CPCP) initiative. Measures Kansas City and northern California counties. By Urban Institute, 2000. [Free] Very Good.
Survey of Public Participation in the Arts 2002
Note summarizing results of survey conducted in 2002. Contains tables with useful percentages of arts participation in both formal and informal arts, for both observers and creators. Written, published by National Endowment for the Arts, 2002. [Free] Good.
Teaching Literacy Through Art
Three-year study to evaluate the impact of arts education on literacy among elementary-school children. Finds that students in the Guggenheim Museum program Learning Through Art performed better in several categories of literacy and critical thinking skills — including extended focus, hypothesizing, and providing multiple interpretations — than did students not in the program. Published by Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 2005-7. [Free] Good.
The Artmaker as Active Agent: Thesis and Interview
Study exploring of the work of six individual community artists as a thesis for a Masters degree in Professional Studies at Cornell University. Combines strategies from arts criticism and social science, creating concept maps, and examines artists' methods by using critical standards developed by artist/scholar Suzanne Lacy. Written by Susan Monagan. Published by Community Arts Network, 2006. [Free] Good.
The Arts & Economic Development: Achieving Results and Measuring Impacts
Study: Measures how to stimulate new thinking and perspectives on how arts, culture and entertainment and how to fold ideas new into state, regional and local economic-development strategies. Data from such initiatives in northeastern U.S. Various authors; commissioned by Northeastern Economic Developers Association (NEDA), 2002. [Free] Very Good.
The Arts and Civic Engagement: Involved in Arts, Involved in Life
Large population survey deemed the first to find links between arts participation and community health. Finding: People who participate in the arts also engage in positive civic and individual activities -- volunteering, going to sporting events and outdoor activities -- at significantly higher rates than non-arts participants. “2002 survey interviewed 17,135 adults ages 18 and older about their activities in a 12-month period.” Written, published by National Endowment for the Arts, 2006. Difficult to navigate portal/reported II07.
The Arts and Humanities in Montgomery County: An Empirical Profile
In-depth profile: How a community with a developing arts culture supports its art and artists. “Showed $40-million dollars with high volunteer support, low private foundation support, and 95 percent of government support going to large organizations. Showed need for more access to public support, greater private support, and need for performance venues.” By Stefan Toepler with Greg Finch (Americans for the Arts and the Arts Policy and Administration Program of Ohio State University, 1999). [Free] Good.
The Arts and Social Capital
Section of a report offering practical recommendations on how to improve social capital, or "social networks and the norms of reciprocity and trustworthiness that arise from them." Useful subsection on trends in arts participation in both formal and informal arts, with statistics and dollar numbers from U.S. (circa 2000). Recommends increased funding for community arts, creating opportunities for collaboration between arts organizations, and making civic dialogue an integral part of artistic productions. By Robert Putnam et al. (In Better Together, a report from the Saguaro Seminar, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, 2001). [Free] Very Good.
The Arts: A Competitive Advantage for California II
Study findings: Nonprofit arts in California added $5.4 billion to state's economy; supported 160,000 jobs; generated nearly $300 million in state/local taxes; ranked California as the nation's leader with most arts-related businesses, with the most people employed in creative industries; were the equivalent of 10,000 small businesses. Comparisons to 1984 study. By Diane L. Mataraza, Inc. (California Arts Council, 2004). Difficult to navigate portal/reported II07.
The Creative Engine
Study: The existence of 150 economic and community development organizations in New York City supports the proposition that nurturing the cultural sector means focusing on the thousands of smaller organizations that feed cultural economic development at the neighborhood level. By Neil Scott Kleiman (Center for an Urban Future, 2002) [Free] Very Good.10
The Informal Arts: Finding Cohesion, Capacity, and Other Cultural Benefits in Unexpected Places
Report: Two-year ethnographic study of participation in the "informal arts" -- diverse creative activities outside traditional nonprofit and commercial arts. “Concludes that "the informal arts occupy a significant place in the social infrastructure of communities, helping to build both individual identity and group solidarity." Makes important case for valuable role of arts in building desirable types of community.” Alaka Wali, Principal Investigator (Chicago Center for Arts Policy, 2002). [$] Very Good.
The Nonprofit Listening Post Project
Survey: Nonprofit agencies serving community and economic development and the arts, etc. Documents the effects of recent economic weakness and government budget cuts on U.S. charitable organizations and those they serve, and how organizations have responded. By Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies (Johns Hopkins University, 2004). [Free] Very Good.
The Regional Arts Lottery Programme: An Evaluation
Evaluation of the U.K.'s Regional Arts Lottery Programme. “Shows how they filled a gap between small project grants and large capital investments, making projects possible and developing organizations. Also makes recommendations for improving the program.” By Annabel Jackson and Graham Devlin (The Arts Council of England, 2003). [Free] Excellent.
The Role of the Arts in Economic Development
Study Brief: How arts programs help state/local governments help generate economic renewal in under-performing regions, assist in downtown redevelopment, help invent "vibrant public spaces" that increase quality of life and positive public image perceptions, and help make communities more attractive to new residents. “Case studies, examples of successful programs, research citations, useful quotes.” Written, published by NASAA, National Governors Association and NEA, 2001. [Free] Good.
The Social Capital Community Benchmark Survey
Largest scientific investigation of civic engagement done (through 2000) in U.S. Respondents and representative samples in 40 communities across 29 states. “Asked about community trust, participation in voting, participation in community groups, arts groups, etc. By The Saguaro Seminar: Civic Engagement in America (John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, 2000).” [$/#] Very Good.
The YouthARTS Development Project: Youth Arts Public Art
Study Brief: “Delinquency-prevention collaboration by NEA and U.S. Dept. of Justice and three local arts agencies in Georgia, Oregon and Texas.” Written by Heather J. Clawson and Kathleen Coolbaugh; published by Dept. of Justice in Juvenile Justice Bulletin, 2001; republished on CAN, 2001. [Free] Good.
Thriving Arts: Thriving Small Communities
Study of ten communities with populations from one to six thousand, identifying five key ingredients to growing an “arts-active” community: • Underlying social context – attitudes and values grounded in acceptance of differences, a welcoming openness and a pride of place • Informal and community-based arts – a valuing of arts in everyday life • Leadership with a broad vision for cultural development and an empowering style • Social networks – integration of the arts into the larger structures of community life • Support to infrastructure development. Written by Sharon Rodning Bash; published by Metropolitan Regional Arts Council (Minnesota), 2003. Difficult to navigate portal/reported II07.
Thriving Arts: Thriving Small Communities
Study: Ten small Minnesota communities seek key ingredients to developing an "arts-active" community: valuing diversity, openness and pride of place; valuing arts in everyday life; leadership with vision for cultural development and an empowering style; social networks; support for infrastructure development. Written by by Sharon Rodning Bash; published by Metropolitan Regional Arts Council, St. Paul, 2006. Difficult to navigate portal/reported II07.
U.S. Artists Report
Online home of "Investing in Creativity: A Study of the Support Structure for U.S. Artists", by Urban Institute. [Free] Good.
Unified Database of Arts Organizations
Joint project of Urban Institute, State Arts Agencies, National Endowment for the Arts, and the IRS. Searchable; contains extensive statistical data on financial support, organizational activities, types and classifications of organizations, etc. Written, published by Urban Institute, 2003. [Free] Very Good.
Weaving the Web of Community
Interactive online report examining a community coalition of 20 cultural, educational and political organizations. Explores how the organizations pooled their time and resources to change their conceptions about the process of social change. Video interviews. Written by Nilima Mwendo and Mat Schwarzman; published by National Performance Network, 2005. [Free] Good.
Why the Arts Matter in Education: or Just What Do Children Learn When They Create an Opera?
Study of school-based elementary opera program. Found that students in the opera setting participate more substantively in group interactions than students in alternative settings. This collaborative work leads to more effective problem solving. Uses both qualitative and quantitative data. By Dennie Palmer Wolf (In Champions of Change, the Arts Education Partnership and the President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities, 1999). [Free] Fair.
pARTicipate San Diego: The Case for Increased Patronage for Arts and Culture in the San Diego Region
Study finding that the San Diego, Calif., region places high priority on increasing arts education; San Diego’s arts and culture community is underfunded; cultural participation needs to be deepened and expanded, leading to greater resources for arts and culture; two-thirds of San Diegans would be willing to pay more taxes to support arts and culture. Written, published by San Diego Foundation. [Free] Good.

Recommend A Study

If you would like to recommend a link to a study or research project that you believe would be valuable to include on this site, please contact jim@7artsfoundation.org . This site has specific research and study foci. The foundation only considers links that fall inside those particular interests. The staff will review your recommendation within thirty days of submission and add it to our database if we feel it would be a valuable addition to our readers. NOTE: The qualifiers - Excellent, Very Good, Good, Fair - represent the view of the Staff as to the usefulness, appropriateness and approaches used to inform our Member arts corridor and arts cluster advocates, participants and critics. Each selection is drawn from reputable, sector-leading research, study or critically acclaimable institutions or other noted organizations. 7AF new all points number: 903.831.9219| M-Th 11-4 CST; Sa. 11-12N CST.